Donate for Kosci

Support the campaign to Reclaim Kosci

The Reclaim Kosci campaign has been created to overturn the NSW Government decision to protect destructive feral horses at the expense of Kosciuszko National Park’s incredible natural values and threatened species.

In the wrong place feral horses are highly destructive animals. They destroy alpine habitat, stomp fragile waterways and threaten native wildlife. They belong in a paddock, not our park.

Scientific advice says we must urgently reduce the number of feral horses in Kosciuszko National Park or risk the future of 31 plant and animal species, including the iconic corroborree frog.

Reclaim Kosci is supported by national and state environmental organisations including the Invasive Species Council, Colong Foundation for Wilderness, National Parks Association of NSW, Nature Conservation Council of NSW and the National Parks Association of the ACT.

We are calling on the NSW Government to repeal the Kosciuszko Wild Horse Heritage Act 2018 and to put in place humane and effective feral horse control methods.

Please support our campaign by making a tax-deductible donation today. Donations go to the Invasive Species Council, which is leading the Reclaim Kosci campaign.

We would like to acknowledge the kind donations made in honour of the recent passing of Dr Graeme Worboys AM. Graeme was a champion of the mountains and protected areas and we are grateful for his leadership and support.

Donations are tax-deductible for Australian taxpayers. The Invasive Species Council is an Australian registered charity.

Andrew Cox, Invasive Species Council CEO

Please support our campaign by making a tax-deductible donation via the form below.

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Donate directly via a transfer from your bank account. Notify us of the amount and your contact details so we can email you a receipt. Our Australian bank account to receive donations is:

Account: Invasive Species Council Inc.
Bank: Bendigo and Adelaide Bank Limited
BSB: 633000
Account No: 117645358
Reference: [enter ‘Reclaim Kosci’ followed by your name]

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Three years of a failed feral horse law

The three-year anniversary of the Kosciuszko Wild Horse Heritage Act has left John Barilaro’s promise to solve Kosciuszko’s feral horse problem...

Feral horse report confirms urgent action needed in Kosciuszko National Park

A 20-year analysis of feral horse counts in Kosciuszko National Park provides compelling evidence NSW’s so-called ‘horse removal program’ has been...

Frog captive breeding program useless without feral horse control

Yesterday's launch of a new federally-funded facility for the the critically endangered northern corroboree frog is welcome news, but efforts to...

Two hat Barilaro: NSW Nationals’ feral horse policy confusion

A NSW Parliament petition calling for an end to feral horse trapping, culling and removal in Kosciuszko National Park has attracted just 4231...

Barilaro comes on board with science-based plan. Time to get on with horse removal.

A post-bushfire estimate of horse numbers in Kosciuszko National Park and a change of heart from deputy premier John Barilaro confirms the urgent...

Peter Garrett Kosciuszko park plea: Urgent need to reduce horse numbers

Australian rock legend and passionate Kosciuszko National Park supporter, Peter Garrett AM, has called for urgent steps to cut feral horse numbers...

Environment minister shocked by feral horse damage in Kosciuszko

Australia's federal environment minister Sussan Ley was visibly shocked at the damage feral horses are inflicting on Kosciuszko National Park during...

What about the horses?

Whataboutism, or whataboutery, is a term I encountered soon after joining the Reclaim Kosci campaign. “What about the 4WDs?” “What about Snowy 2.0?”...

An ex-ranger’s experience

I worked as a NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service Ranger from 1974 to 2014. With Paul Hardey, I monitored brumby running within Kosciuszko...

A view from the air

I am a helicopter pilot. To me it’s a privilege to work in the air. I flew the media over the opening ceremony for the Sydney Olympics and the 2003...

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Kosciuszko National Park from destructive feral horses.

8 Comments

  1. Lorraine Tomlins

    It’s not just Kosci, we need to save many other places too. Habitats are shrinking and impacting on our species diversity.

    Reply
  2. Stephen Gye

    Keep up the good work. We will never give up.

    Reply
  3. Jane Fountain

    I am a member of the Australian Native Plant Society and I have learnt of the incredible diversity of our native plants from the many experienced members of this society. I have also learnt how vulnerable many species are, having adapted to one particular environment. This alpine area is so rare in Australia, and the plants are especially adapted to live in the habitat niches they have found. The hard hooved horses with large appetites are a disaster for this delicate environment.
    The brumbies do not belong where they destroy the plants that provide food and shelter for special native animals.
    Please protect our unique natural environment by removing the destructive feral horses.

    Reply
  4. Alison Lyssa

    Our environment is precious. Save the Snowy Mountains from the damage the wild horses cause with their trampling, weed-spreading, stream destroying behaviour and the threat they are causing to the already precarious survival of the original fauna and flora.

    Reply
  5. Ian Willis

    Preserve this valuable wilderness.

    Reply
  6. Roger Murphy

    Time for all governments and public bodies to ensure that decisions being made are sensitive to the environment first and centre else we’ll have concrete and tar everywhere.

    Reply
  7. Roger Murphy

    Keep the pressure on Mr Barilaro and also the Premier of NSW for enabling and allowing the “Wild Horses Heritage Bill” to be facilitated through NSW Parliament. The premier should have stopped this Bill and she has remained out of the discussion of this issue.
    The K National park is a valuable space for native flora and fauna and more so now with extreme weather events affecting the survivability of the native species, its certainly not a place for ferals.

    Reply
  8. Deidre Shaw

    This unique area is special for the flora and fauna found nowhere else,. Some of which is rare and on the brink of extinction, but the area also has significant cultural value for the Aboriginal people who have called this place home for a very long time.

    It is time to remove feral horses which do not belong here and give all the locals, be they animals, plants or people a chance to enjoy and protect this special environment

    Reply

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Reclaim Kosci represents a broad consortium of individuals and organisations that love Kosciuszko National Park and seek to protect it from the impacts of feral horses.

Reclaim Kosci respectfully acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the land on which we live, work and learn. We pay respect to elders past, present and future, and recognise the continuing connection of Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander peoples to the land, water and culture.